This Is My Spear

This video contains images from public posts to social media over the last 120 days. Of course, Mauna Kea, is the issue, but the focus is on us, the Kanaka 'Oiwi Hawai'i. The mele, “Na Kaua E Pale,” was written and recorded by my dad as a message to all of us, to stay strong as a lahui, even when times are hard or when some of us are losing hope. The video is our way of saying mahalo to all who stand on the Mauna, to those who live aloha ‘aina, and to those who work hard to unite our people. I am inspired daily by your examples of kapu aloha and strive for that in my own life. I hope that this video can help share that message with others. -- Malama Kealoha

If you would like to make your own video, "Na Kaua E Pale," is available here for free download.  Send us your video link or post it to our Facebook page and we'll send you a link to download the rest of the album for free.  Aloha forward.

I Ku Mau Mau

 E Malama o Lilo I ka Lima a Pa by Chucky Souza, 1991 (Lithograph 5x7in).

E Malama o Lilo I ka Lima a Pa by Chucky Souza, 1991 (Lithograph 5x7in).

A few days ago I read a courageous and caring letter to the leaders of the state-led sovereignty movement, entitled “Can’t You See Us Rising?” by Noelani Goodyear-Kaopua.  In her letter she challenges core arguments for the ongoing re-iteration of OHA’s Native Hawaiian roll with personal observations and acts of self-determination, what she calls true expressions of independence.

Malama Music Publishing was created as an expression of independence, to support musicians who consciously represent themselves and their culture.  Our songs are our stories and, as I have shared in earlier posts, expressions of our genealogy and our identity.  It has been an uplifting journey for me to understand who I am and how I fit into the woven fabric of my genealogy.  And there is still so much more to learn and to understand.

In order for these expressions of independence to become woven into the fabric of nation-building, we must have a strong understanding of our identity, as individuals and as a collective.  It is imperative that we, as indigenous people, know who we are.  I do not think that the Hawaiian community at large can yet define itself, and I further believe that this is the key to addressing any and all challenges facing our community.  We are today because of our kupuna before us and our keiki after us.  Yet culture evolves and changes with technology and time. So our identity concept must both steadfast and dynamic.  

 photo courtesy of Chucky Souza

photo courtesy of Chucky Souza

I created a Flipboard Magazine that I hope can contribute to finding solutions to this ongoing identity crisis, helping our people to find the balance between ancient and modern, tradition and innovation, and the confidence to know which is which.  

The magazine is a collection of media that captures those expressions of independence, that I call “I Ku Mau Mau” moments.  I plan to add content to the magazine as often as I find it, and I hope that this collection can be a source of strength for those feeling alone, scared, or worried along their personal journey of self-determination.  Here is the link: http://flip.it/iBYfM

If you would like to share an article, video, or post that should be included, please use #ikumaumau on Twitter or Instagram or message/mention @MalamaMusicPubl.

What Happened?

What Happened?

Chucky Souza entered the Hawaiian music scene in the 1970s, a time when Hawaiians were re-connecting with the world.  Hokule'a sailed its maiden voyage to tahiti, sending the message that Hawaiians are still here, still practicing our culture, and ready for the future.  This "Hawaiian Renaissance" was a coming out party.  There was a feeling of excitement.  We could be "traditional" and "modern" at the same time and still be Hawaiian. Contemporary Hawaiian music and musicians were ready to take on the world. So what happened?

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